Tips for surface modeling on Rhino

Good Day.
I'm developing a race car project and have already finished all the chassis, suspension and drivetrain projects. All I need now is to develop the fiberglass outer body.
I'm using Rhino 4.0 and have little knowledge with surfaces. All kinds of tips would be aprecciated.
Thanks in advance.

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8 Answers

Learn the loft command, then sweep rails and fillet surfaces. That should get you by. You will build some ugly surfaces, just make sure you extend them so you can chop off the ugly bits to patch your model together. Thats how I taught myself to model boat hulls and superstructure.

 
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in relation to Joules, to obtain no flat curves, use curve of two views, curves/curves of two views.
you can draw a sketchin top and side view, photograf and put in rhino then copy and make curves of two vies

 
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I really like T-Splines for surfaces. As others said, Rhino isn't the best for precision work. It's tough when I take my digital work to other vendors.

 
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first of all, draw the car outlines on the top and side view, then use Crv2View to make the lines so you can eventually start adding surfaces, it sounds hard but it just takes practice, always remember to use tangent lines so you get the flowy surfaces.

 
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I agree with t-splines as I use it like crazy / I get great shapes bt choosing lines and using the different adjustments but the one that gets the best are the red blue breen circle adjusters. You can get great edges that have unique curves and along as you use cemetery ,it can come out useful!

 
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Are you sue you want to do all of the body in Rhino? I would suggest to start off with a model made in SolidWorks or any other program that's a bit more precise, and engineering-focussed. After you have all the needed distances set out by planes or solids, you can take it to rhino tomodel the exterior nicely. Try to set out some major lines with the spline tool (in the side view port, for example) and then work your way from one end of the car to the other. I would also suggest to break the whole body apart into the lowest possible most easy shapes. Like making a giant bubble as a start for the roof. Then make planes to cut pieces out, and add things here and there. you can also use the blend tool. For this to function properly, you need enough distance between the two surfaces you want to blend, you need the surface to either have both an open or a closed contour to blend, no shapr edges etc. Lots of work to get it right, but it should be worth it in the end (real nice transitions from one shape to the next). Have fun making your car!

 
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Hello
If you send me the portion of the file that you have problem with and tell me what you need ,I can help you,
I am very good at surface modeling.

 
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I have two Different ways to get the shapes I want or need, one I can use an ellipsoid to start with ( a basic solid) make it the size I need or larger and add the points to change the shape completely. this gives me a slick rounded surface to work with, Second I take a basic solid box and make it larger than needed then make other boxes as tools to Boolean Difference and carve away what I don't want and leave behind the shape I want. It's very effective when you want flat surfaces mostly. I found this is normally a quick and easy way to get those angles like an F-118 stealth fighter has. So between the two I can get curved and flat surfaces. I make a lot of tools in this manner which i delete latter on. On sailboat hulls the ellipsoid works great. A lot of it is trial and error to get just the right shapes so undo is a good friend so you can backup and adjust to try again.

 
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