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35Tutorials'''' KeyShot tips(Step By Step)"''

By Alireza SKH on 10 Dec 11:22 65 answers 136784 views 35 comments

i want to create a great collection of KeyShot Tips.
Add any tutorials that u think can be helpful.
any site, Weblog and anything to develope our Keyshot Skills.
Thx guys.

65 answers

  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    KeyShot - Jewelry Lighting(Step By Step)

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  • Josh Mings
    Josh Mings almost 3 years ago

    Here's how to change existing materials to custom materials... so easy.

    It's important to note that all materials in KeyShot are scientifically accurate materials with properties added to be the most realistic possible.

    Also, if you're looking for more settings on your materials, you can select the 'Advanced' Material Type in the pulldown, located next to the material thumbnail in the Materials options.

    1. Step 1

      Say you want to change a plastic material to glass or maybe you just imported a model and it has no materials.

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    2. Step 2

      After the model is open, go to the materials you want. In this case we want to change it to glass. You may not see the color you want, but that's ok. Drag and drop one of the glass materials onto the part you want to be glass. Here we dropped the red glass onto the outer part. It updates instantly.

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    3. Step 3

      Next, double-click on the part you just dropped the material on. The material properties will come up. To change the look, simple select the color option and adjust the color to what you need.

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      Additionally, you can add that material to the library. In the Material option, change the name to what you like then hit the save button (disc icon to the right) or right-click on the part with the material and select 'Add material to library." Navigate to the relevant material group and select OK. Done!

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    How to Create the Perfect White Paint Material

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      As for material there really isn’t a secret formula. When I do paint, it’s from scratch every time. The dome you use will dictate what you do with your paint. Here is what the material setting are for the white paint in this scene.

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    2. Step 2

      Here is the HDRI I created out of LightStudio. Again the dome is created for that Vehicle at that angle. If I would do a different angle I would have to update the dome. More then likely this dome would not work for a different vehicle.

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    3. Step 3

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    Rendering SolidWorks Models Faster with KeyShot

    1. Step 1

      If you use SolidWorks to model up some sweet design, there’s an extremely easy approach to import SolidWorks models into KeyShot that will have you creating 3D renderings faster than you can imagine… even faster than setting up materials and using Photoview 360 to render your models. Here’s how to do it.

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    2. Step 2

      SolidWorks to KeyShot

      All the colors your apply to the parts in your SolidWorks model will import into KeyShot. You can, however, make this process much faster with a little prep on the SolidWorks side.

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    3. Step 3

      1. Grab the SolidWorks to KeyShot plugin
      First, grab the KeyShot SolidWorks plugin. It’s free and makes it a one-button snap to bring SolidWorks models into KeyShot. Now, the plugin certainly makes importing faster, but you can simply import .sldprt and .sldasm files directly into KeyShot. And guess what? With KeyShot 3, you can do this on both PC and Mac.

      2. Use standard colors for your standard parts
      More than likely you have standard colors that you use for your parts. If you do, you’re all set and KeyShot will import those parts with the colors you have applied. If not, a simple color chart can be used to reference materials. Something as simple as grey for hardware, brown for wood, and so on.

      3. Use the Display Pane to set colors
      When you need to set colors fast in SolidWorks, use the Display Pane in the FeatureManager sidebar. This will allow you to see and select parts/bodies much quicker. After selection, simply select Edit, Appearance, Appearance… from the pull down menu (or Edit Appearance – the multi-colored ball – from the Heads-up display menu.)

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    4. Step 4

      SolidWorks to KeyShot Tips

      If you want a representative color to show in KeyShot, use colors in SolidWorks instead of SolidWorks Materials (Appearances)
      For part files, apply different colors to geometry (bodies) you want to be able to change material/move/scale
      For assembly files, apply colors at the part level for best results
      Colors applied at the part level will override those at the bodies and face level
      Colors applied at the assembly level will override those at the part level
      Change an imported SolidWorks part to an Emmisive material to create a light in KeyShot. Deselect Visible to Camera in the advanced material options to hide it.

  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    Create Perfect Glass and Liquid in KeyShot

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      For those of you interested in liquid renderings, take a look at the .bip and check out how the IOR values are set up on the various surfaces. These values create realistic refractions through the glass and liquid.

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    3. Step 3

      You can download the file directly right here (Red Wine.zip (16MB)) If there are examples of glass and liquid you would like to share or any tips you’ve found helpful, send them in or add them in the comments section below!

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    8 Tips to Be More Efficient with KeyShot

    1. Step 1

      Keyshot is a wonderful program as you know, but… it’s like Photoshop – if you don’t know what to do, the fantastic tool would be nothing. Here are some tips to create very nices images and understand how to enjoy this terrific program.

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      Look at the real world
      First, consider this. What is your work, your passion, your way, the style of image you want to do? Automotive, engineering, flowers, shoes? …Your answer will show you the direction to go with your renderings. LOOK AT REALITY. In the real world, even a mirror or chrome will NEVER have 100% reflection. A mirror is created with a special overlay under glass. A glass bottle ALWAYS has bumps. (Look close at a real glass bottle.) It’s the same reason with movies, why you might say, “It’s done in 3D.” The result is too perfect, too mathematical. Reality is not mathematical, there are a thousand mistakes and variations in reality. A good graphic designers knows that. Photographers, graphic designers and retouchers are some of the few who understand the beauty and the complexity of our reality. We always try to copy it and we tend to see more than others – it’s a fantastic mess of mistakes. Now, to approach this situation and have a better point of view on the topic, let’s capture our scene.

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      The set up
      Create a simple scene on a table – Some fruits? A plate, a glass of water, a cigarette, some shoes, some letters, papers and ink near a bottle of perfume, some gold part and chrome parts? Choose items you will use in the future for your job. Now, your composition, your scene is done.

      The lighting
      Next, let’s do the lighting. Take a simple spotlight (the one you use for reading a book in an office table for example… yes, like the one in the PIXAR logo :) ) The purpose is to be alone in the dark, with a single spot lighting your scene. Try to be alone in your room, and use ONLY a single spotlight. Try lighting your scene from the front, from the side, and from the back.

      The photo
      Take a simple photo (with your mobile phone, with a semi-professionnal camera, all are ok for this) of all these angles. Of course, you can use a mirror to reflect the light of your spotlight (to create an amazing light reflection in the glass of water for example…) Play with the scene. Look the glass. It will have many reactions, like the gold parts of your scene, or chrome parts. Capture this in the photo.

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    4. Step 4

      Why are we doing this? We are doing this because KEYSHOT IS A DIGITAL CAMERA. Now, let’s get into KeyShot and re-create the same scene with the same objects and models.

      Set Environment
      Use a simple HDRI. To create a single spot HDRI, create an image in Photoshop – Black, with a lens flare in the middle and save it as 32 bits in .HDR format (radiance). Now, add this to your Environments library and double-click it to add to your scene in KeyShot. Try to create THE EXACT PHOTO you did with your single spotlight in your room. (Even better if you can create an HDRI of your room! Here is a good tutorial to create your own HDRI’s.)

      Set Materials
      Now, attribute materials. This is the trick to get really accurate images. You have to modify or create materials to be EXACTLY like the photo you did. You can create your own Materials in KeyShot. In this way you can begin to create your own material library with the materials you use the most. You have a greate example of reality to base it on – your photo. In the future, when you have to create a scene quickly, you’ll be able to just use your own gold. This speed up the process immensely!

      For example, my gold is always the same. I stook a lipstick container and studied it. You know on a lipstick container, it’s not real gold. It’s plastic painted in gold. So I did a photo of the lipstick and I created a gold paint to be EXACTLY like my photo. So, when I use this material, I select “paint” as my base material in KeyShot. Now, I always use the same gold. Of course, it changes depending on which HDRI I use. There is a lot of lighting adjustment, but I know my gold paint is the best (for now.)

      The materials provided with KeyShot are very accurate, but don’t forget this – a red car is never 100% red. Take a photo of a red car, go into Photoshop and analyze the color. You will be surprised. Most of the time a red car is seen by our eyes as brown in reality. That means KeyShot materials are good bases to work on, but it will never replace your own creative feeling.

      So now, when a client is asks for a car render, you should have all your own materials ready and be able to work faster than if you had to create everything from scratch.

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    5. Step 5

      8 Tips to be more Efficient in KeyShot

      EVERY material has reflection in reality (even tires of cars.) Even if it’s not a bright reflection, this little detail will bring the reality to your scene that you expect.
      SEE THE REALITY BEFORE CREATING A SCENE. Search Google for images, some examples, of what you are about to do.
      CREATE YOUR OWN MATERIAL LIBRARY and save every materials you make. You will win time for your next render.
      UNDERSTAND PHOTOGRAPHY because KeyShot is a digital camera. If you don’t understand photography, you won’t be able to do good renders. Try at home on objects with a spotlight as seen before… read some tips on Google, there is thousand of tutorials about Photography… it can give you ideas.
      CREATE YOUR OWN HDRI with Photoshop. Try some tests with a white paintbrush on a black background and see the results. Hint: start with the ones in KeyShot!
      LOOK THE ADVERTISING and try to re-create the same images seen on Digital professional websites.
      BE ABLE TO GUESS what HDRI is used when you see a scene with a chrome or a reflective model (like a car.) Practice a lot of HDRI’s to know what to do when a client is asking for a quick result.
      EVERY MATERIAL HAS BUMPS (even chrome, glass, carpaint and mirrors.) Even if it’s only 0.000000000001% bump, it will bring reality to your render.

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      Last Bit of Advice

      Do reality, not what you think reality is (I mean the exemple of the lipstick : it’s not real gold, it’s plastic painted in gold, so do the same for all what you will work on )Keyshot will bring you a photo. Of course, like a real camera, sometimes you will decide to enhance this photo on photoshop. It’s what I do most of the time to have this « advertising » feeling, but it’s because it’s my job ;-) So, practice in real before going on your laptop, look carefully the reality… this is the best I can tell… And I did 14 years of still life photography to be able to tell you all these things. ;-)

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    Simple Animation in Keyshot 3

    1. Step 1

      First up is importing the model to be animated. In this case I decided before had that the elements I would animate would be the five gems, the five mounts they sit in, and the main ring. I made sure in Lightwave that I separated these out in to layers to make them editable individually in Keyshot. You may notice the watermark top right denoting the activation of performance mode, just to make things a little snappier on more modest hardware.

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    2. Step 2

      With the first element selected, click ‘Add Animation’ to the upper left f the scene tree. Two options are available at this point. New Rotation which allows us to specify simple rotation, or New Translation for element movement.

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    3. Step 3

      Having selected to add a translation animation, I then simply enter (or adjust interactively with the sliders) the amount of translation in X, Y, and Z. You will then see a green block appear in the animation time-line editor which represents the translation we have created, spanning it’s set duration in time. You can at this stage drag the end of the green block and extend the time over which the translation takes place.

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    4. Step 4

      What I am now doing is animating the mount that the gem was seated in. I can right click the translation node of the gem in the scene tree, and copy the animation. This will allow me to paste the animation on to an element of the scene without having to create it from scratch.

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      I then right click the mount in the scene tree, and past the animation. What I can also do if the animation is to be identical is to paste a LINKED animation to the element. If I then ammend the animation on the original element, all linked animations will also update.

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    6. Step 6

      What we now have is two animations, and therefore two blocks in the animation editor. Both are at the same start and end positions.

      To make things look cooler, what I really want is the gem to lift away first, and then the mount to follow just after it. To achieve this all we need to do is grab the second animation in the animation editor with our mouse and drag it a short way along the time line, offsetting it from the gem. Their relative starting and stopping positions will remain the same, but we’ll have a slight delay before the mount moves.

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    7. Step 7

      I’ve repeated the process of creating animations for each gem, and then copying and pasting the animation to the corresponding mounts, and applying the same relative offsets. The interactive nature of the workflow means this really takes no time at all.

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    8. Step 8

      In the same way as the gems and mounts, I’ve added animation to the main ring band; a simple translation upward, and a simultaneous 180 degree rotation. This essentially leaves our frame clear of any visible elements.

      Clicking the eye icon gives you the facility to render a low resolution preview animation, which you can study and scrub back and forth. If you want to keep it you can save the movie file. It’s also worth mentioning at this stage that the gear icon next to the preview icon opens the settings panel which will allow you to specify the requires FPS for the animation.

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    9. Step 9

      The last step is to render the animation. Hit the render button, and switch from still to animation. How long the render will take can be influenced in numerous ways. One is to set the number of samples per frame, or defining how long each frame is allowed to render. If quality needs to be more specifically controlled you can switch to advanced mode. This will afford you individual control of GI, shadow, aliasing, and DOF qualities amongst other things.
      The Finished Article

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    How to Create Cloudy Plastic Material in KeyShot

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      Have you ever wanted to create a material that had the appearance of cloudy plastic? This type of material would be used for packaging, plastic lids, storage containers and other slightly transparent parts. In this quick tip Brian Townsend shows you how to create any color cloudy plastic with varying levels of clarity using the ‘Advanced’ material type

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      Cloudy Plastic Material in KeyShot

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    4. Step 4

      Creating a cloudy plastic material couldn’t be easier. With KeyShot, you have an Advanced Material. Double-click on your part, select Advanced from the material type pulldown and you’ll see a set of options that provide complete control over the appearance of the part. There are three settings you’ll adjust – Diffuse, Specular and Specular Transmission. This translates to:

      Diffuse – level of cloudiness
      Specular – intensity of highlights
      Specular Transmission – opacity and color of transparent plastic

  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    Textures in KeyShot: Creating Bump, Color, Specular and Opacity Maps (Really Fast)

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    2. Step 2

      What are Bump, Color, Specular and Opacity Maps>?

      First, here are a few quick definitions of the different types of maps.

      Bump Map – Uses white and black values to create the appearance of raised and lowered areas.
      Color Maps – Uses an image to replace the color of the material.
      Specular Map – Uses white and black values to create areas of more reflectivity and less reflectivity.
      Opacity Map – Uses black and white values to create transparent areas and opaque areas.
      How to Create Bump, Color, Specular and Opacity Maps (Really Fast)

      There are various ways to do create these types of maps, from taking photos of textures to finding them online, but to create all four map types, the method below is the absolute fastest, easiest route. Before we start, this assumes you have a basic understanding of the Photoshop interface.

      Step 1: Create a texture in Photoshop
      Create an new image at 1200 x 1200 pixels. Add a new layer then select the brush tool (B). Select your preferred brush, the color you would like to use for a texture and paint away. You can download custom brushes from sites like brusheezy.com. You can also modify the Brush settings by going to Window > Brush and adjusting the Brush options. You’ll end up with something like this.

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      Create the Color Map
      If you want the unpainted (white) areas to be transparent, hide the Background layer. Then save the image as a .PNG format to preserve the transparency. This will allow the painted areas to show on your model with the diffuse color showing in the transparent areas. You should have something like this.

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      Create the Specular Map
      Double-click on the painted layer to bring up the Layer Style options. Select Color Overlay and choose Black as the color. Save the image as a .PNG format to preserve the transparency. The black areas will have 0% relectivity and the white areas will be 100% relflective. The image should look something like this.

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    5. Step 5

      Create the Bump Map
      Show the background layer, then save the image. The black areas will appeared lowered and the white areas will appear raised. If you like, you can add a little blur (Filter > Blur > Gaussian Blur) to make the transitions smoother. The image should look something like this.

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    6. Step 6

      Create the opacity map
      Flatten the image (Layers > Flatten Image) then select Image > Adjustments > Invert. You have a few options in KeyShot for Opacity maps, but basically, this will show the black areas as completely transparent and the white areas as completely opaque. This assumes that you want the painted areas to be the opaque areas. You should have an image like this.

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    7. Step 7

      Typically, Opacity maps would be used for something more like a mesh or wire material, but can be handy for rust spots, decay or broken out views as well. With the Color maps you can also add other colors, gradients or use actual images of wood grain, paint splatters or rust.

      The value of creating all of these together like this, allows you to sync all maps together perfectly when adjusting the scaling and position. That’s what we’ll look at next time.

      Here’s one more shot with a different color map and diffuse color.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    Rendering White materials.

    1. Step 1

      The key to getting the white to look nice is to adjust those gamma values in the environment tab and realtime tab. It is a good idea to start off with the realtime gamma somewhere in the 1.8 to 2.2 range.

      You can increase the environment gamma to get details back from blown out areas, and increase the realtime gamma to get a nicer, more gradual falloff of light across the material. adjust environment brightness to lighten or darken the entire scene.

      For the material, set the color to 100 percent white, and then use the gamma controls to really fine tune the visual result of the material. Try increasing the IOR to get a bit more reflection.

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    2. Step 2

      If you're working with a white material that is amongst other darker materials, you may not be able to adjust the gamma settings as much without negatively affecting the darker materials. In this case, you will need to tune the white material back down from 100 percent white to bring its brightness down to work well with the other materials.

      You also may want to consider using a dark color background so that the white material you are rendering stands out.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    KeyShot 3.1: The New, Extremely Fast Metallic Paint

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      Metallic Paint
      If you thought achieving the perfect car paint material in KeyShot was simple before, it’s now even easier and more accurate. Where you use to create the look of Metallic Paint flakes by reducing the metal samples, you now have actual paint flakes and the ability to tune the paint interactively. In the Metallic Paint material options, you have two additional settings: one to control the Metal flake size and another to control the Metal flake visibility, allowing you to dial in the appearance as fine as you like.

      Here’s just a little example of what control you have. With each screenshot, the size and visibility of the paint flakes is increased. The last one is a bit extreme just to show the level you can take it to.

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      The adjustments you have for the Metallic Paint are located at the bottom of the Metallic Paint properties options. Really, couldn’t be more simple.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    How to Render Water in KeyShot (and Easily Create Bump Maps in After Effects)

    1. Step 1

      Step 1 – Creating the Water Bump map in After Effects

      Start After effects, Create a Composition with Aspect Ratio 2048 x 2048 and name it Noise.
      Create a solid with the same aspect ratio.
      Apply the fractal noise from the effect menu to the solid.
      Under the effect Controls tab change the fractal type to Dynamic twist, set the Noise type to spline, check the invert box, adjust contrast to 55 and brightness to -7 and the complexity 12.

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    2. Step 2

      As we only need a frame of our composition, select Composition, Save Frame As…Set where you want to save your file and Press Render.

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    3. Step 3

      Tiling and Blurring the displacement map in Photoshop

    4. Step 4

      Open the Noise file in Photoshop.
      Under the filter menu apply the Offset effect.
      Set the Horizontal to + 973 and Vertical to + 690.
      Using the clone tool, clone out any seams that you see.

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    5. Step 5

      Select the layer and apply the Gaussian blur filter with Radius 5.Save the file as a jpeg image, we will come back to it later!

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    6. Step 6

      Creating a scene
      Create a plane, name it water and set the Subdivision Width and Height to 20.
      Duplicate this plane, change the name to reflection and move it below the water plane.
      Create a Camera – Place it at the edge of the water and face it toward the horizon line.

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    7. Step 7

      Change the viewport from perceptive to camera 1 , select all geometry and scale them in x to fill in the gap on the sides.

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    8. Step 8

      Create a poly sphere and place it above the water.

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    9. Step 9

      Select the camera, navigate to the Attribute Editor and change the Film aspect ratio to 1.78.
      Before leaving Maya, we need to make sure that every object in the scene has a different material. Under the hypershade create three different lamberts and assign one per object.
      To export the scene select all geo and camera from the outliner and export them using the FXB format.

    10. Step 10

      Open Keyshot
      Import the FBX from Maya
      Using the material Editor, Drag and drop the water material from the liquid group on top of the plane.

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    11. Step 11

      Next, Drag the Brick material from the architecture group and Drop it on the bottom plane.
      Right click on the bottom plane to bring up the options for the Brick material. Uncheck the fresnel option.
      Assign a chrome material to the sphere and bring down the brightness of the diffuse Color.
      Under the option tab (Projects, Camera tab in KeyShot 3), change the view from active to camera 1. This should load the camera that we brought from Maya.

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    12. Step 12

      Load the HDRI using the environment tab. The one I used comes with keyshot and is called “hdri-locations_iceland_4k_hdz”
      Under the environment option make the following changes:

      Height -0400
      Size 8.5850
      Rotation 21.180

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    13. Step 13

      Load the bump map you created earlier in the bump channel of the water material.
      Change Scale U and V to 0.180.

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    14. Step 14

      Under the Camera option turn on depth of field and use the pick focus to define the focal distance of the sphere.

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    15. Step 15

      Last step, Press Render in the main viewport and your done!

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    How To Use Opacity Maps in KeyShot

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    6. Step 6

      To make sure I could get the scale of the perforation right, I added a small reference piece of real perforated plate. Then, I just drop the “Aluminium circular mesh” material onto the turquoise parts. It’s found under Metal > Aluminium > Mesh.

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    7. Step 7

      You see… it’s a good thing I took the reference part! Selecting the material and going to the Textures tab, I select the Bump map and enable Sync. This way, any change I make to the bump map, will auto-synchronize with the opacity map. Now I changed the scale to 0.085.

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    8. Step 8

      As you can see, there is a difference between the two. However, which one do you prefer visually?

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    9. Step 9

      How about now? After adding the black fiber fabric material to the part behind it and zooming out, you can hardly tell the difference.

      Now for the rest of the louvre, I chose chrome for the screws and a copy of the mesh material for all other visible parts. I did remove the bump map and the opacity map from the copy though, just to make sure both aluminium materials look the same.

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    10. Step 10

      Now for the detail shot settings. After zooming in and moving the frame part out of the way, we get to see the inside of the louvres.

      In doing so, I noticed that the perforations of the louvres are almost oval-shaped. This is simply because the material uses a box map. I initially set everything up to be the same as the bottom insert, which is vertical. The other inserts are at an angle, so the projection of the perforation is wrong. This is simply solved. Just unlink the material from the vertical insert and edit the material to reorient the map.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    Rendering Realistic Human Skin

    1. Step 1

      The 3D geometry was created in DAZ Studio 4 and exported in .obj format along with textures for skin and hair. This is what the model looks like before any textures are applied in KeyShot:

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    2. Step 2

      As you can see the hair doesn’t look very realistic. To make it more realistic, I used the color and opacity textures previously exported from DAZ Studio and applied it to my hair material (in UV Coordinates.) After adjusting the reflectivity of the hair, this is what it looks like.

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    3. Step 3

      For the skin material, I used the default skin material from KeyShot and added the exported color and bump textures to it. After adjusting height of the bump and tweaking contrast of the color texture, an environment needed to be selected. This was the trickiest part of all because I needed environment that would not make my model too contrasty or too dark. Finding the right environment lighting was pretty straight-forward, but using the Environment Editor in KeyShot 3.1 would have made it much quicker. Now I was ready to make my final render which looked like this.

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    4. Step 4

      The only thing left to do was to add some lens flares, lower down the contrast a little bit and darken overall image in PhotoShop. Again, having the Environment editor would have eliminated this step. Now, for the final result:

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    5. Step 5

      Fast and simple inside KeyShot. Tiho used a variety of textures and materials exported from DAZ 3D. Here’s a sample of what bump and color maps he used after bringing the model into KeyShot and applying the materials.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    Textures in KeyShot: Adding Textures to Your 3D Model

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    2. Step 2

      Step 1: Apply a material
      As you know, applying materials is just a drag and drop from the Material Library. Go ahead and apply the material you would like to use – something close to what you part is made of. In this case, we’re applying the standard steel material to all the parts on the Universal joint, making some slight adjustment to the color.

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    3. Step 3

      Step 2: Apply Textures
      Double-click on one of the parts you want to apply the textures to. Select the Textures tab. For metals, you have the choice of adding a Color Map, Bump Map and/or Opacity Map. Double-click on Color Map and select the image you created to use as a color map. Do the same for the Bump Map.

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    4. Step 4

      Step 3: Sync your maps
      Before you go any further, you want to select the ‘Sync’ options – really important. This keeps all the maps lined up with each other when you start scaling, shifting and moving them about.

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    5. Step 5

      Step 4: Set your map type
      This is where you’ll start refining the look of your texture. There are seven types of texture mapping in KeyShot. You will want to use the best mapping type for your model. Here is a brief definition of each:

      Planar X – Texture displays normal against any surface on the X axis and stretched across surfaces on any other axis.
      Planar Y – Texture displays normal against any surface on the Y axis and stretched across surfaces on any other axis.
      Planar Z – Texture displays normal against any surface on the Z axis and stretched across surfaces on any other axis.
      Box Map – Texture displays normal from both directions on the X, Y and Z axis. Seams may be visible where they meet.
      UV Coordinates – Textures displays as if projected on flattened 3D geometry. These maps are typically created with UV Mapping tools.
      Spherical – Textures display as if projected from a sphere.
      Cylindrical – Textures display as if projected from a cylinder.

      Generally, Box Map will work in most cases.

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    6. Step 6

      Step 5: Adjust your map type
      This is the step where you will do the most tweaking – scaling and positioning the map for the look you desire. Don’t worry too much about color or lighting at this point. First, work in the default Startup Environment and orient the texture to your liking. Try different settings, adjusting bump height, angle and scale. Once you get the position and orientation you need, it’s always a good idea to lock your camera (Select the Camera Tab and click the ‘Unlocked’ Button in the upper left to change the camera to ‘Locked.’)

      Step 6: Adjust Lighting and Material
      Once you’ve got your texture applied, mapping set and camera locked it’s time to fine-tune lighting and material. This, of course, leaves a lot to personal taste. While changing settings, it’s always a good idea to look at the value you had before adjusting, just in case you want to change it back. If you like one appearance and what to try some others, just save out a copy and carry on with the tweaking.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH about 2 years ago

    The Masterful 3D Renderings of Mikael Lugnegård

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  • Robert Voogt
    Robert Voogt almost 3 years ago

    When you download keyshot, all the current available materials are included.

    So when you install keyshot, the materials are there.

  • Josh Mings
    Josh Mings almost 3 years ago

    KeyShot 3 comes with over 700 materials. More will be added in the near future. You can download KeyShot 3 with animation here: http://www.keyshot.com/downloads/

    Let me know if you have any questions on materials. You can create your own custom materials starting from one of the others.

  • William
    William almost 3 years ago

    Great to see a nice Keyshot tutorial on GrabCAD
    I hope many more will follow as a lot of GrabCAD users
    have Keyshot as there renders software of choice.

    Just a question Josh and maybe an idea here -
    would it not be great to have some of the Keyshot
    team to come over from time to time to GrabCAD
    and renders some of the models in the library
    just like Bunkspeed so I think Bunkspeed do a great
    job with GrabCAD but Keyshot seems to be the main
    renders software for us on GrabCAD and it would be great
    to have the Keyshot professionals have renders put up.
    It would also be great advertisement for Keyshot here on
    GrabCAD.

  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    Turning Wheels

    1. Step 1

      have a Quick look on this pic friend.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    Using KeyShot and Flash to Create an Interactive Website Presentation

    1. Step 1

      ....

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    2. Step 2

      It’s true. KeyShot users create incredible 3D renderings and animations. You’ve probably seen a lot of product design images on website and wouldn’t even know that they were once drab, colorless 3D geometry. A few minutes in KeyShot and that drab geometry is turned into a photorealistic image. It’s exactly what Ryan Fenik of LayerZero did when he created the images for the product presentation on their website. He purchased KeyShot and in less than a week created the renderings and animations that would illustrate the functionality of their power systems. We caught up with Ryan to break down the process for you on how he did it.
      KeyShot and Flash

      LayerZero Power Systems uses Solid Edge to model their Remote Power Panels, Distribution Units and Static Transfer Switches. A Static Transfer Switch is an device that transfers electrical power between two sources, typically from a primary source to a standby source. LayerZero Power Systems static transfer switches do it in less than an electrical quarter-cycle. Here, Ryan covers the steps he went through to create an interactive product experience using Keyshot, After Effects and Flash.

      Here is how I created the visuals for the Series 70 eSTS: 4000A Static Power Switch:

      1. Imported our Solid Edge files into Keyshot, animated each of the doors opening, applied paint textures and labels.
      2. Exported the animation frame-by-frame with a green background, no ground shadows or reflections (450 frames took about 18 hours to render.)
      3. Import the images as a sequence into Adobe After Effects.
      4. In After Effects, select Effect/Keying/Keylight 1.2. Select the eyedrop of “Screen color” to the green color in the frame. This removes the background.
      5. Export the animation from After Effects as an RGB + Alpha FLV to your desired output size.
      6. Import the FLV file into Flash as an embedded movie clip.
      7. Created buttons for each of the interactive sections, and linked to the appropriate section in the movie clip.

      Notes:

      * The preloader was also animated and rendered in Keyshot.

      A big thanks to Ryan for this great overview on how they’re using KeyShot and how they’re presenting the product online.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH about 2 years ago

    KeyShot Great Renders(Keyshot3 Power)

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH almost 2 years ago

    How to Create 3D Cutaways with KeyShot Renderings

    1. Step 1

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    2. Step 2

      Creating 3D Cutaways
      To create a cutaway, as shown above, you first need to render out separate images of the model using the same camera settings for each. For example: the first render is the car body, the second render is the car frame and so on. For this particular image, I rendered four separate images as shown below.

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    3. Step 3

      After you render all the images, import them to Photoshop. Every image is on their own layer keeping in mind that the image of the car body must be on top of all the other layers. It should look something like this:

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    4. Step 4

      There are few ways to create a cutaway. You can use the eraser tool to erase part of top layer and show part of the layer below or you can use layer masks which preserve your image by only masking the portions you apply a color to. Here, I will show you how to make transparent areas using layer masks. First, make sure you are on the top layer. Then, select the area you want to be transparent, either using the magnetic lasso tool or marquee tools. Now, we need to Feather (Select, Modify, Feather…) the edges of the selection, ensuring a smooth transition from transparent to opaque. The feather radius depends on how gradual a transition area you want. Here I used radius of 15 pixels.

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    5. Step 5

      Now, create a layer mask by clicking: Layer/Add Layer Mask/Reveal All. A layer mask icon will appear on the right side of the selected layer in the layer window. It is important to switch to our layer mask by clicking on it once to select it. Next, we will paint it. After you switch to the layer mask, select the brush tool and select black as the primary color, adjusting the opacity of the brush somewhere between 30%-50%. Start painting over the previously selected area of the picture, you will notice how the layer underneath it starts to appear. If you need to make the area more transparent just increase the brush opacity and repeat brushing.

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    6. Step 6

      After brushing with 27% brush opacity:

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    7. Step 7

      And after some more brushing:

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    8. Step 8

      As you can see that’s pretty much it. Other transparent areas of the car were made using the same method. After this, I increased contrast a little bit and sharpened the image.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH about 2 years ago

    User Interface Part1

    1. Step 1

      General

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    2. Step 2

      Interface

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    3. Step 3

      Folders

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    4. Step 4

      Advance

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    5. Step 5

      RealTime Window...

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    6. Step 6

      Materials

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH about 2 years ago

    User Interface Part 2

    1. Step 1

      Project Window

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    2. Step 2

      Scene Tab

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    3. Step 3

      Material Tab

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    4. Step 4

      Environment file
      This will list the name of the currently loaded environment image.The supported formats are .hdr and .hdz (KeyShot proprietaryformat).
      Contrast
      This will increase or decrease the contrast on the environmentwhich can sharpen and soften the shadows. It will also increasethe intensity of the light and dark areas which can negativelyaffect the realism of the lighting. For realistic lighting, it isrecommended to leave this at the default value.
      Brightness
      This will control the amount of light emitted into the scene fromthe environment image. If the rendering is too dark or too brightthis can be adjusted.
      Size
      This will increase or decrease the size of the environment domethat is lighting the model.
      This is a method of tuning thereflections and lighting in your scene
      Textures
      This will shift the height of the environment dome up and downwhich is a method of tuning the reflections and lighting in thescene
      Rotation
      This is a value that will set the rotation of the environment and isanother method of controlling your lighting and reflections.
      Background
      Here you can set the background as the lighting environment, asolid color or use an image as a background.
      Ground shadows
      Here you can enable the ground shadows in the scene. Whenthis is on, there is an invisible ground plane that shadows frommodels are projected on
      Ground reflections
      When this is enabled reflections of any 3D geometry will be showon the same invisible ground plane that ground shadows areprojected on.
      Shadow color
      This will allow the ground shadow color to be set to any color.
      Flatten ground
      This will flatten the ground of the environment dome. It is onlynoticeable when the 'lighting environment' is set in the
      background option listed above.
      Ground size
      This will increase or decrease the size of the ground plane thatshadows and reflections are cast on. The best approach is toreduce the ground size as much as possible without clippingshadows or reflections.

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    5. Step 5

      Camera menu
      This drop down menu will show all cameras available in thescene. If a camera is selected in the drop down, the realtimeview will switch to looking through that camera. Cameras can besaved or deleted from the menu by clicking the plus or minusbuttons.
      Unlocked/locked buttons
      This will lock and unlock the currently selected camera. If thecamera is locked all parameters will be greyed out and cannot bechanged.
      Edit mode
      This is for camera animation and is a method of preventinganimated cameras from being moved unintentionaly. If ananimated cameras position needs to be changed, edit mode willneed to be enabled.
      View orientation
      This has preset view for front, back, left, right, top and bottom.Selecting any of these will move the currently selected camera tothat position.
      Distance
      Distance will dolly the camera in and out. When the value is 0,the camera will be at the exact center of the world. The larger thenumber, the further away from the center the camera will be.
      Azimuth
      This will control the orbit of the camera. The slider range goesfrom -180 degress to 180 degrees allowing cameras to orbit 360degrees around their look at point.
      Inclination
      This will control the vertical inclination of the camera or"elevation". The slider range goes from -89.990 degrees to89.990 degrees, allowing cameras to look directly down ordirectly underneath objects.
      Twist
      This will twist the camera which will tilt the horizon line and allowthe creation of "dutch angles".
      Perspective and orthographic
      This will switch the currently selected camera to haveperspective or to be viewed in orthographic mode. Orthographicmode will show the 3D model with no perspective.
      Perspective
      This will keep the model framing in the realtime view whileincreasing the perspective effect

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    6. Step 6

      Resolution
      Setting the resolution will change the size of the realtime view.When 'Lock aspect' is checked the height to width proportions willremain the same when the realtime view is resized freely or whena value for width or height is typed in manually
      Brightness
      This will control the brightness on the rendered image in therealtime view. It is applied as a post process (similar to adjustingbrightness on an image in Photoshop) so the image does nothave to be recalculated when adjusted as it does whenenvironment brightness is changed.
      Gamma
      This is a setting that compensates the way colors are displayedfor optimal color range for human vision. It can be thought of asa form of contrast. Lower values will increase contrast and highervalues will decrease contrast. It is recommended for realisticrenders to leave this value at the default. It is a very sensitiveslider and can cause unrealistic results if adjusted too much ineither direction.
      Quality
      This slider will automatically increase or decrease quality settings
      to improve performance for working in the realtime view
      Ray bounces
      This will increase or decrease the amount of times a ray of lightis bounced around a scene. It is very important for calculatingreflective and refractive materials. For more information on raybounces see the section that covers
      ray bounces
      in
      realtimesettings
      .
      Shadow quality
      This will increase the number of sub divisions in the
      groundplane
      . That will give the ground shadow more resolution
      Detailed shadows
      This will control the vertical inclination of the camera or"elevation". The slider range goes from -89.990 degrees to89.990 degrees, allowing cameras to look directly down ordirectly underneath objects.
      Detailed indirect illumination
      Detailed indirect illumination allows indirect light bouncingbetween 3D geometry and allows other geometry to beilluminated when under transparent materials.
      Ground indirect illumination
      Ground indirect illumination allows indirect light bouncing from 3Dgeometry onto the ground.

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    7. Step 7

      KeyShot Import Setting

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  • Robert Voogt
    Robert Voogt about 2 years ago

    How to correctly get liquid in a glass.

    1. Step 1

      First, the three methods from left to right.

      The left one is the most incorrect. There are 2 bodies, the glass and the liquid. The liquid body intersects with the glass part (both surfaces of the bodies are in the same space) creating a banding effect.

      The middle one has the liquid body scaled down a notch. This works for renders where the glass is in the distance. However as you can see, the liquid does not appear to go all the way to the outer surface of the glass body.

      The one on the right is the correct one, with the liquid "touching" the outer surface of the glass body.

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    2. Step 2

      Here you can see what the difference is in solidworks

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    3. Step 3

      The solution is to create the top surface of the liquid as a surface, and assigning the same material to the inner wall of the glass. Create the split line if its missing from your model.

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    4. Step 4

      Here a reference to show that the liquid in a glass really does seem to touch the outer side of the glass.

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    5. Step 5

      So, how to do this?
      First, create your glass.

      Then, add a "line" where the top of the liquid will be.

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    6. Step 6

      Use the split tool to create a line in the surface, only select the line and the inside surface of the glass.

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    7. Step 7

      And there you have it, an intersection line.

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    8. Step 8

      Now, create a surface top, make sure the end of the sketch line touches the line you just made on the glass surface. Don't forget to add the vertical construction-line.

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    9. Step 9

      And revolve this with surface revolve.

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    10. Step 10

      Then, give the inside surface of the glass and the top-surface the same material.

      And import your model to keyshot!

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH about 2 years ago

    Editing and Saving Materials

    1. Step 1

      Editing materials

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    2. Step 2

      Saving materials

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH about 2 years ago

    Texturing overview Part1

    1. Step 1

      Texturing overview
      Texturing allows images to be mapped to materials to create the detailed effects such as wood grain, meshes, tile and fine imperfections such asbrushed metals. Textures are applied in the
      material properties
      under the texture tab. The image below shows an example of the type of effectsthat can be created using textures.

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    2. Step 2

      Texturing mapping overview
      Texture mapping is a way to to take 2D images and place them onto 3D objects. This is a common problem that all 3D applications must addressin some way. KeyShot must know how to take a 2D image and place it onto a 3D object. For example, does it place it from the top? On thebottom? From the side? The examples below cover the methods KeyShot has for addressing texture mapping

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    3. Step 3

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH over 2 years ago

    ur welcome Wilson.i will add more tutorials in the near future.

  • Robert Voogt
    Robert Voogt about 2 years ago

    And here the ice cube tutorial.
    (http://grabcad.com/questions/how-to-correctly-render-ice-cubes-with-keyshot)

    1. Step 1

      First, we are going to look how it can be done (wrong). Three methods again, and the differences are quite obvious.
      The approach per method is the same as the previous tutorial about the liquid, showing how wrong you can get if you stick with the wrong method.

      The left one has the ice cubes placed in the liquid, but as can be seen it occupies the same space as the liquid.
      The middle one has cut out the ice cubes first, so in the liquid there is space for the ice cubes, after using the split feature and delete feature the original ice cubes were scaled down with a factor of 0,999. This way there is no contact between the ice cubes and the liquid. (same as how the liquid is positioned compared to the glass, see my other tutorial, link above).
      And of course, the third method is the best and surprisingly the fastest.

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    2. Step 2

      And here how the different methods look in keyshot

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    3. Step 3

      Reference for ice cubes.

      Note: these are clear ice cubes, made by cooling boiled water.

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    4. Step 4

      So, how to do this?
      First design an ice cube

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    5. Step 5

      And place the ice cube in the glass by using "move/copy body"

      Make it realistic looking, and try to avoid clipping as much as possible.
      Clipping is when 2 bodies go through each other.

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    6. Step 6

      Because the third method is the right one, we will only focus on this third method.

      Select "surface trim"

      Select the face of the ice cube as trim tool and the liquid top surface as keep selection. I had to do this twice, for I had 2 ice cubes sticking out.

      Note: this step is only necessary if you have ice cubes sticking out of the liquid.

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    7. Step 7

      Now you are ready to go to keyshot and import the model.

      Once in keyshot give every part the material you want (for the liquid and glass that is).

      The ice is a special material and very important to the quality of the final render.

      Please use these setting.

      I used the Gem material because ice is neither glass nor liquid.
      It also gave the opportunity to enter some special values, these values are correct for ice (abbe number and refraction index).

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    8. Step 8

      Now it is time to start rendering.
      I used the settings below, and they are my personal settings. However, one thing is very important. The rays need to be at 13.
      For me, with 14 or more keyshot crashes. If you manage to get more it is great!
      Or if keyshot crashes with 13, try lowering the rays.

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    9. Step 9

      The end result.
      note, the dark sections which in reality are there as well. Further, there is a bit of frosting on the sides of the ice cubes.

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    10. Step 10

      How to make it more frosty,
      Play with the roughness and glossy samples, making them higher.

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    11. Step 11

      This is how it looks when it is more frosted.

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    12. Step 12

      If you want to know what the settings for the liquid are.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH almost 2 years ago

    Free 3D Environment for KeyShot

    1. Step 1

      As you know, the environment lighting in your scene is incredibly important. In the end, it determines how your materials look. High-quality HDRi’s can be hard to come by, so we’re please to have one recently submitted by KeyShot customer, HiDynamic Productions. HiDynamic is a service and source for high quality 360° HDRi’s scenes. They’ve recently shared a 3D environment on the forums optimized for KeyShot and absolutely free for you to download.

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    2. Step 2

      3D Environment for KeyShot

      From HiDynamic, “We are giving away a free demo environment optimized for KeyShot rendering. This scene is based on a 360° HDRi with the corresponding customized dome geometry. For more flexible camera positioning we have added a detailed high resolution ground texture.”

      The scene comes as a 53MB .ksp with the HDRI, textures and settings needed to drop in your 3D model and go. You can download it here from hiDynamic productions for free.http://3d.hidynamicproductions.com/resources/keyshot-free4you

      This scene is not only a great HDRI environment, but also a great example of using 3-dimensional structures with your environment in KeyShot. In the scene, there’s a box that has the wall, floor and sky mapped accordingly. An Emissive material is used for each with the Advanced ‘Visible in Reflections’ and ‘Visble in Shadows’ settings both unchecked. This is a great use of Emissives and a great example of 3D scene creation for KeyShot.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH about 2 years ago

    How to Render Realistic Ice in KeyShot

    Added images

    Square
    1. Step 1

      Step 1 – Creating the model

      Open SolidWorks and create your model. Here you can see that the glass is made with a simple ‘Revolve’ feature, and the cubes are duplicated and stacked with many ‘Body-move/copy’ features. Since this tutorial is about KeyShot, I’m assuming that you know your way with SolidWorks, or already have a model to work with, and so I won’t get into the details of this particular build. (Note: You can also use this model of Ice Cubes found on GrabCAD.)

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    2. Step 2

      Step 2 – Import to KeyShot

      Open up KeyShot, and insert you model via drag & drop or the “Import” button. Initially, you will see the entire model painted white. Open up the ‘Project’ window by pressing the spacebar or from the button below. Here I already renamed the parts to ‘glass’ and ‘ice’, so I would know what I’m working on. I selected all the ice parts and ‘Unlinked’ their material association.

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    3. Step 3

      Step 3 – Change the material

      For the glass, I changed its material to ‘Solid Glass’. I left all the options at their default.

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    4. Step 4

      Step 4 – Adjust material settings

      Next, I selected one ice cube, and assigned a ‘Liquid’ material to it. Crank the ‘Refraction Index’ all the way to 3, set the ’ Refraction Index Outside’ to 1.5, and ‘Transparency’ to 8. Then set the color to Red:220|Green:230|Blue:255.

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    5. Step 5

      Step 5 – Create the texture

      The ice cube will become clear, but there is still something missing. If you look at frozen ice, it is nearly always not entirely translucent. This is because as the water freezes, air bubbles and particles in the water, get caught up in the frozen ice. To achieve the icy look, we need to set a bump and opacity map, and for this we need to create a texture in Photoshop. Open Photoshop and create a new empty document with the size of 5000X5000 pixels with a white background.

      Then, create a new empty layer, and put it below the background layer. To do this, right-click on the background layer and select ‘Layer from background…’. Set a mask on the white layer by clicking on the “Add layer mask button”. The reason I’m using a mask is that I can always change or replace the mask without affecting the image layer itself. Now take a large bristled brush, and paint on the mask with black color, leaving a “frame” around the corners of the page. Don’t worry about getting it all fully black, we want some white and gray shades to show through the middle. It helps to put a black background to get a better sense of the result. Eventually, what you will get, is a white frame with no background, that resembles cracked ice.

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    6. Step 6

      Step 6 – Save the texture

      Go ahead and save that file as a PNG. The PNG file type can contain transparency, as opposed to JPEG. And now you have your texture.

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    7. Step 7

      Step 7 – Apply the texture

      In KeyShot, head back to the ‘Material’ tab in the ‘Projects’ window. Go to the ‘Texture’ tab, and set a ‘Bump’ and ‘Opacity’, by choosing the newly created texture file. Hit the ‘Sync’ checkmark, so that if you decide to change some of the properties, it will link the bump to the opacity. That’s it, your new ice material is complete. At this point, you can save the new material in the material library for future use.

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    8. Step 8

      Step 8 – Copy-paste the material

      Return to the ‘Scene’ tab and copy-paste the ice material to the rest of the parts.

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    9. Step 9

      Step 9 – Adjust the Advanced settings

      The ice looks much better now, but it still looks opaque. This is because of the way that KeyShot renders light through materials. We have to go to the ‘Settings’ tab, expand the ‘Advanced’ section and increase the ‘Ray bounces’ from the default 6 to 12. This may differ in your project, so be sure to play with the value till you get the right one. And don’t just put a high value, as the rendering can take unnecessarily very long. Next, turn on ‘Global illumination’, and if you like, put a nice darkened ‘vignette’ to the scene. I didn’t increase the bloom in this scene. I will talk about the ‘Bloom’ setting in another tutorial.

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    10. Step 10

      Step 10 – Apply the environment

      Things are looking great, but we still need to set a lighting environment. Open the “Library’ and set a nicely contrast environment. I chose ‘3 point sharp high 2k’.

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    11. Step 11

      Step 11 – Adjust the environment

      Back at the project menu, head to ‘Environment’ and change the settings to your liking. I chose to put a color behind the model, instead of the ‘Lighting environment’, and set it to a deep cool gray (Red:3|Green:3|Blue:4). If you like, check ‘Ground reflections’ on.

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    12. Step 12

      Step 12 – Adjust the camera

      Next thing to do is to set a camera, so head to the ‘Camera’ tab at the projects menu. Click on the ‘+’ to create a new camera, give it a name, and click “Enter edit mode”. Set everything to your liking, including a depth of field, to create the feeling of a close up shot. By adjusting the “F-stop”, you can make the object out of focus more blurry, but careful not to make it to blurry, just enough for it to look real. When you’re done, click “Exit edit mode”, and then “Lock camera”.

      Quick tip – if it takes too long to move the camera around the object, try hitting ‘Alt+P’ to temporarily pause the real-time render engine.

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    13. Step 13

      Step 13 – Set up your render quality

      Now let’s go to the ‘Render’ menu. First, jump to the “Quality’ tab, and set the quality as high as you like the result to be. Cranking up the ‘Samples’ will give a higher quality render, at the cost of time. Also increase the “Depth of field” value, as we are using depth of field in the scene. And last, check that the ‘Ray bounces’ are set to 12 (or what you intended it to be).

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    14. Step 14

      Step 14 – Render/grab a drink

      Now head back to the ‘Output’ tab. Set your required image size. The more pixels you have, the better the result would be fit for printing. You can get the pixel equivalent for centimeters/ inches by opening a new document in Photoshop and changing between sizing methods. Also, as you can see blow, I chose to save as TIF, because it would give me an image with no background. I prefer to create the background in Photoshop, and this way I have complete control of the rendered model and the background, separately.

      In this manner, you can later seamlessly implant the object into a previously rendered scene or a photograph. At this point, you can choose to render to JPEG, as we already set the desired background in KeyShot, but I still want to tweak the final image a bit more in Photoshop. Hit the ‘Render’ button, and go grab a drink, it’s going to take a while… :)

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    15. Step 15

      Step 15 – Final output!

      And here is the result – a high quality rendering that took nearly 10 hours! It took that long because of the complexity of the layered transparent parts, and because I set the sample rate relatively high. In general, rendering time is also affected by part’s opacity, and by depth of field and other visual effects (such as bloom).

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    16. Step 16

      And finally, here is a full resolution image of his drinking glass submitted for his ‘Concepts’ course. Bottoms up.

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  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH almost 2 years ago

    How to Create Animate Lighting in KeyShot

    1. Step 1

      ...

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    2. Step 2

      You’ve probably seen commercials or animations where the lighting moves across the vehicle or product accentuating its lines and curves. It’s a fabulous way to bring life to the product you’re showcasing and it couldn’t be easier to create in KeyShot. In this three minute step-by-step and video, you’ll see two ways of animating lights in KeyShot 3. One approach uses an Emissive material applied to an object that moves across the scene. The other approach uses an animation applied to the model and the camera. Both are extremely easy and give you a perfect to create dramatic lighting using KeyShot.

      Animated Lights in KeyShot

      To create an animated light in KeyShot, there are two approaches you can take.

      Approach 1: Emissive material

      Insert a plane or sphere and use a translate animation to move across the model.
      Apply an Emissive material to the sphere/plane, increasing the intensity and disable ‘Visible to Camera’ in the Advanced settings.
      In the Project, Setting tab, enable ‘Global Illumination’.

      Approach 2: Animated environment

      In the Project, Camera tab, set up a camera view and save it.
      Apply a 360 degree Orbit to that camera.
      Add a 360 degree turntable to the model going the opposite direction.

  • james lenane
    james lenane over 1 year ago

    Just got KeyShot and was looking for some tutorials to start me off and found these,fantastic information here and a huge thank you for taking the time to put these together,it really is appreciated by me and many others I'd say!
    Thanks again and all the best foe 2013!

  • Yannick Herinckx
    Yannick Herinckx 10 months ago

    render using keyshot

    1. Step 1

      1 : open the file you want to render

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    2. Step 2

      2 : choose the file and press open

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    3. Step 3

      3: choose your oriëntation and press ok

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    4. Step 4

      4 : open library and choose the material what fits with your design
      than drag the material to the surface you want to paint/ give a texture

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    5. Step 5

      5 : when you double-click on a surface,you get a window where you can change the settings, the settings are for every material different
      - surface color is the main color of the surface
      - subsurface is the color of the shine on the surface
      - translucency is how good you can see through a surface
      - with roughness you can change the shining, how higher,how less shine

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    6. Step 6

      6 : when you open the library again,and than open Environments/backplates or textures, you can choose the background for your rendering. To choose a background simply double-click on it
      When you choose a good background,your rendering will be more realistic

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    7. Step 7

      7 : when you click render at the botom,you get a window where you can choose the options for your rendering, than press rendering in the window

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    8. Step 8

      8 : than wait untill your rendering is done, when you chose an high quality for your rendering,you must wait longer
      DONE!!!!

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  • pavan
    pavan over 2 years ago

    grt tutorials you shared with us
    thanks.

  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH about 2 years ago

    How to Create Clear Tinted Glass in KeyShot

    1. Step 1

      You know KeyShot has the easiest to apply and most accurate glass material for 3D rendered images. Drag,drop and you’re ready to go. You can also achieve a tinted glass effect very easily for older style glass bottle or any object you would like to show just a touch of tinted color.

    2. Step 2

      Clear Tinted Glass in KeyShot

      Brett describes the steps he used to create the tinted glass:

      1. Create a cyan gradient texture map in Photoshop that fades to transparent on top and bottom.
      2. Adjust the overall opacity to 30%, exported the file as a .png (with transparency)
      3. Apply it as a “label” on the glass material.
      4. Set the mapping to cylindrical and adjust the label intensity to 2.5 to help pop the color.

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    3. Step 3

      That’s it, apply the above gradient (or one of your own) to the KeyShot material as a label. If it looks too small just adjust the scale to suit. Applied as a label, you can also add other labels to sit on top of or behind the gradient

  • Alireza SKH
    Alireza SKH about 2 years ago

    How to Create Object VR’s with KeyShotVR

    1. Step 1

      ...

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    2. Step 2

      Creating a KeyShotVR

      After you purchase the KeyShotVR add-on, you’ll have an additional button in the KeyShot menu. Selecting KeyShotVR will bring up a wizard that takes you through all the steps necessary to create the visuals and embed code.

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    3. Step 3

      1. Pick your VR Mode

      You have four options: Turntable, Spherical, Hemisperical or Custom. You’ll see a preview of each one as you select it.

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    4. Step 4

      2. Pick your VR Center

      You have three options here: Environment, Object or Custom. If you select Custom, you’ll be able to select the object, to locate your center around, from the hierarchical list of models in your scene.

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    5. Step 5

      3. Pick Intial VR View

      This is the first frame of your KeyShotVR. Fine tune the Distance, Azimuth, Inclination and Perspective with an option to show a grid dividing the screen in thirds to help compose the image.

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    6. Step 6

      4. Set VR Smoothness

      This allows you to see the smoothness of the VR independent of both Vertical and Horizontal frames. The number of frames will be the multiple of vertical and horizontal frames, so with 20 Horizontal and 10 Vertical, you will render 200 frames.

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    7. Step 7

      5. Set VR Output

      The final step before Rendering is to select your output. Supply a name and location or use the defaults provided. From this screen, you’ll have access to start the rendering or go to the Render Settings for further options–options for play button, level of detail, mouse sensitivity and more. The VR Render options are always available from the Render Settings menu under Output.

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    8. Step 8

      You’ll notice that it’s also touch-enabled, so you have an interactive viewing experience on mobile device or tablet.

  • wilson.thor
    wilson.thor over 2 years ago

    grt tutorial
    thanks for sharing it to us.

  • jozedwardo
    jozedwardo over 2 years ago

    Incredible tutorial, Thank you very much, very useful. To Lekaimadh, What software do you use for rendering that has led you to have that opinion about Keyshot?

  • filipiguan
    filipiguan about 2 years ago

    congratulations from metal textures give thanks helped me.
    Greetings from mexico

  • Ahmad Moayyednia
    Ahmad Moayyednia about 2 years ago

    یا مریم مقدس .. یه سوالو این همه جواب

  • nila
    nila about 2 years ago

    thanks..it is good..

  • Imran Manik
    Imran Manik almost 2 years ago

    hello sir your models too nice
    sir it can be possible with siemens NX8.0

  • pk3610
    pk3610 almost 2 years ago

    where do i get to download key-shot ? can any one suggest me useful link pl thank u....

  • jose
    jose over 1 year ago

    excellent

  • vlatko
    vlatko 5 months ago

    Hi, these tutorials are great! Thanx!

    Can you please explain how to render a white glossy plastic with the green LED behind. The plastic is 1mm thick and the green light from the LED is coming through the plastic. I have tried many ways, but can't get it to work.

    Thanx

  • Rick Chapman
    Rick Chapman 27 days ago

    These are fantastic! I have learned a lot from your tutorial.
    I do have a question though. In SolidEdge I have a number of items that are all the same, for example water filters. As water passes from one to another it becomes clearer in real life. When I try to apply a color to any on of the items they all change color. Is there a trick to only change the color on one of the items?
    Thanks

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